Fitness

Wellness

Weight loss do’s and don’ts for every body


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By Hunter Irwin, Edited by Rachel Petersen

Losing weight can be a difficult and long process for just about everyone who undertakes it. Consider the fact that if weight loss were easy, it wouldn’t be a multibillion dollar industry made up of books, pills, subscription services and more. But not everyone’s weight loss journey should or will look the same. There are 7.7 billion people in this world and we all have different bodies. As a result, we need to sift through the mountains of information out there to find the do’s and don’ts of weight loss that will work for everyone.

Keep these weight loss tips in mind as you embark on your own journey to a healthier you.

Don’t go hungry

Depriving your body of the food it needs to survive doesn’t work. Your body will use the fat that you’re trying to lose to keep your body operating. You will not get the nutrients your body needs to keep going and you will see your energy decrease as a result.

Do eat healthy

Eating healthy is one of the most important factors when trying to lose weight. Instead of feeding your body junk food and other unhealthy or heavily processed foods, eat protein, vegetables, fruits, and grains. Keep your diet consistent and stick to a plan. Eating better will also leave you feeling and functioning better.

Don’t think short-term

There is no overnight solution to weight loss, period. Reframe your diet into a lifestyle change that you can stick to. Thinking of it this way will help with keeping the weight off in the long run and staying healthy throughout your life. Plan your new habits around long-term goals and mentally prepare yourself for changes.

Do drink water

We know that we need water to survive, but drinking the recommended amount is crucial when it comes to weight loss. Experts recommend between one and three litres of water per day to help with weight loss and your overall health.

Don’t overdo it

Exercise is a key component in weight loss but it is possible to exercise too much. When exercising, spread it out. Create a workout plan and a routine that you can follow but do not overdo it. Too much exercise can lead to injuries, exhaustion, energy imbalance and heart issues.

Do follow your plan and routine

Creating and following a diet plan as well as a workout routine is an absolute must. It will be easier for you to achieve success and reach your goals when you have a system you can stick to. A system will also allow you to focus your energy elsewhere as what you need to be doing is already mapped out. Stick to your plan and you’ll achieve your desired results.

Wellness

How to balance education and fitness effectively


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By Vendat Patel, Edited by Paula Lacsena

How many times have you heard the phrase “I don’t have time to work out because of school”? I bet more times than you can count. What if there was a way you could do both and excel?

Here are some tips to consider in order to exceed in education and fitness simultaneously:

1. Plan your sleep schedule appropriately

A lot of students tend to avoid working out due to a lack of time, but they can plan their sleep in a way that gives them more time for exercise and alternative activities. Waking up early (between 6 a.m. to 9 a.m.) gives you more time in your day, allowing you to focus on your daily tasks more productively.

2. Plan and prepare quick work outs

College and university students can use their time between classes more fruitfully by exercising, preparing quick work-outs that require little to no equipment to stay in shape. You can start by finding yourself a quiet place to plan and complete a cycle of body workouts.. To ensure that you don’t overexert yourself, you can start off with a low-intensity work out plan then gradually move your way up to moderately-higher intensities of a faster pace.

Here is an example of a workout cycle that can be done in under  30 minutes:

  •  10 Push-ups 
  •  15 crunches/sit-ups             
  •  10 Squats
  • 15 Lunges on each leg (30 Total)

3. Follow a consistent daily schedule

To maintain proper balance between school and exercise, it’s important that students commit to a daily schedule structured reasonably around their goals. Planning your day makes you accountable for accomplishing the goals you have set for the day, especially if you have a physical list you want to accomplish. To maximize your time, you can start by separating your school goals from your physical goals; that way you can set time aside to complete one goal and follow with another.  Prioritizing exercise for at least 30–45 minutes a day will enable you to maintain balance on top of school.

Trust me, your body will thank you!

Wellness

Exercising for the body and mind


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By Mariana Rosa, Edited by Rachel Petersen

The first thing a lot of people think of when they hear the word “exercise” is weight loss. They’re not wrong for making this connection, but exercising can improve your health and well-being in many different ways beyond weight loss. What very few people realize is that when you exercise, you’re not only taking care of your body and reducing the risks of developing chronic diseases, but also looking after your mental health.

Studies have shown that staying active helps our brain to produce serotonin and hormones such as endorphins, which have been proven to reduce the symptoms of anxiety and depression. In some cases, exercising can work just as effectively as taking medication to treat these conditions. According to a study published in Lancet Psychiatry in 2018, any type of exercise carried out between four to five times per week resulted in participants experiencing improved mental health. In addition to this, the study also determined that certain activities such as team sports, cycling, and aerobic/gym workouts are the most effective when it comes to improving mental health. These activities have the most benefits as they get participants out of the house and often into group dynamics where they can socialize, reducing feelings of loneliness and isolation.

It’s important to understand the link between physical and mental health to get the best results out of your work out, but this also includes knowing your limits. The Lancet Psychiatry study also found that too much or excessive exercise can have a negative effect on people experiencing anxiety and depression. The trick is to start slow and listen to your body when working out. So long as you’re acknowledging and respecting your limits, exercise will have some great benefits for body and mind.

Fitness, Wellness

Rebounding for Health


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reboundRebounding has many health benefits.   Rebounding increases both blood and lymph circulation.    Comparing the circulatory system to the lymphatic system,  the average person has 5 – 6  liters of blood circulated through  the heart. and the lymphatic system has three times that much fluid.  The circulatory system has the heart to pump the blood throughout the body.  The lymphatic system has to work against gravity and needs to rely on you to move it through your body.  The lymph systems one way valves can be increased by about ten times bouncing and jumping than at rest.  Thus you are removing toxins at a higher rate and allowing the white blood cells to get to areas of the body where they need to be – increasing your immunity!

This is one of the reasons why less active people are more susceptible to illnesses.  Poor diet can burden the lymph system as well with more accumulation of toxins and waste in the body.

Almost anyone can benefit from using a rebounder.    You do not have to jump on a rebounder in order to gain benefits.  You can bounce, or if limited mobility can sit or if more limited even just rest your feet on the rebounder while someone else is doing the bouncing can still have an impact on lymph flow.

Rebounding can produce up to 2 – 3 times vertical gravitation.  This can serve as a bone strengthener while remaining low impact.  It is gentle on joints, cartilage and vertebrae. It increase lymphocyte activity, strengthen your muscular system, development, and endurance,  helps to improve balance and proprioception, strengthens cells, improves cardiovascular function, and can help to improve the effects of other exercises.   There are also some other benefits such as mixing up your routine, working on coordination, rhythm and boosting your mood!

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Wellness

You should sleep more


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Many people think that we should aim for 8 hours of elusive sleep each night but most people do not really understand the importance sleep plays in our physical health. Like helping to repair and healing blood vessels. Sleep also helps with high blood pressure. Increased risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke and kidney diseases are all linked to lack of proper sleep. Sleeping also plays a restorative role on the brain. Memory consolidation occurs during slow wave and as such, different pieces of what we learn during the day are pieced together and carefully stored as knowledge to be accessed later.

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Extra sleep has also proven to improve athletic performance. In 2008, a study of five swimmers showed that when they extended their sleep to 10 hours a day for six to seven weeks, the athletes could swim faster and react more quickly.  Similarly researchers at Harvard University and Boston College found that during sleep is when emotional components of memory are strengthened. As a result, sleep aids in creativity. 

Sleep also helps with weight loss.  Or at least helps with curbing appetite. Hunger is controlled by  two hormones: leptin and ghrelin. Leptin is a hormone that is produced in your fat cells. The less leptin you produce, the more your stomach feels empty. The more ghrelin you produce, the more you stimulate hunger while also reducing the amount of calories you burn (your metabolism) and increasing the amount fat you store. In other words, you need to control leptin and ghrelin to successfully lose weight but sleep deprivation makes that nearly impossible. Research published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinoloy and Metabolism found that sleeping less than six hours triggers the area of your brain that increases your need for food while also depressing leptin and stimulating ghrelin.